New Year Honours – Dame Shirley Bassey ‘humbling’

Dame Shirley Bassey said she was “humbled” to be recognized in the New Year Honors list.

Cardiff-born Dame Shirley has been made Maid of Honour.

He said his heart was “full of emotion”.

A number of other Welsh recipients have also been recognised, including youth cancer fundraiser from Pembrokeshire and water safety activist Debbie Turnbull.

Dame Shirley said: “Music has been a constant companion in my life.

“As a little girl growing up in Tiger Bay, I dreamed of traveling the world, and never imagined that, one day, my voice would take me to where I am today.

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“Every step in my career has been about taking chances, believing in myself and making that leap.

“I live to sing and love to perform. Entertaining audiences for over 70 years has been an honor. My heart is full of emotion and I am truly humbled.”

‘Miracle’ youth fundraiser
Dubbed a “miracle baby” when she was born, 13-year-old Elly from Pembrokeshire has been praised by the Dalai Lama and former prime minister Theresa May for her fundraising for cancer patients and cancer services.

Now he has been awarded the British Empire Medal (BEM) for helping raise more than £200,000 for Withybush Hospice, which helped his father Lyn survive a rare blood cancer.

He also raises money for his charity and Hywel Dda Health Charities, the official charity of Hywel Dda University Health Board.

“We are very proud of her,” said her father, Lyn, 61, who five years before Elly was born, was told that her condition meant she could not have any more children.

“She is our miracle baby, we were very surprised and happy when we found out Ann [Elly’s mother] was pregnant,” he added.

Helping others after losing a child
Flintshire-based water safety campaigner Debbie Turnbull and NHS counselor Sadia Sadiq, 46, from Cardiff, both know how devastating it is to lose a child.

They have been appointed Members of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for their efforts to overcome tragedy to help others.

Debbie, who lives in Holywell, founded River and Sea Sense after her 15-year-old son Christopher drowned at Cyfyng Falls near Capel Curig in Gwynedd in 2006.

He said he was “speechless” when he received the letter recognizing his water safety education services to youth and families.