President Joe Biden, on a West Coast fundraising swing, attended a shiva to mourn Norman Lear, who died this week at age 101.

President Joe Biden, on a West Coast fundraising swing, attended a shiva to mourn Norman Lear, who died this week at age 101.

Biden attended the shiva at the Lear residence, according to the White House.

The president and former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a longtime friend of Lear’s, also paid tribute to him at a Hollywood-centric fundraiser for the Biden-Harris reelection campaign.

Biden said at the event, “His cast of characters painted a — a fuller picture of America, of our hopes and our hardships, our fears, our resilience, and changed the way we look at ourselves.

“In explaining his approach to getting the laugh — to get us to laugh and think, Norman Lear said, and I quote, ‘You stand a better chance if you can get them caring first’ — ‘if you can get them caring first.’ Folks, at our best, we’re a nation that cares.” The president, referring to the coming 250th anniversary of the United States in 2026, also noted that Lear bought an original copy of the Declaration Of Independence.

“And he shared it with schools and museums so people could feel the patriocy that comes from being moved by its words,” said Biden.

“I don’t believe, in our 250th year, this nation is going to turn to Donald Trump,” Biden said.

The president paid tribute to Lear earlier this week as a “transformational force in American culture,” and also noted his decades of political advocacy, saying that he “fought directly for free speech, a woman’s right to choose, the environment, voting rights, and more.”

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Lear’s political impact went well beyond the influence of his shows. In the early 1980s, he founded People for the American Way, an advocacy group that countered the emerging power of the religious rights. The organization has been part of some major political battles, including the opposition to the nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court in 1987.

Biden was attending private fundraising/campaign gatherings with high dollar donors through the day on Saturday, including one in Beverly Hills, and he is scheduled to headline an event with First Lady Jill Biden on Saturday evening.

On Saturday afternoon, the first lady attended a fundraiser at NeueHouse Hollywood hosted by Matthew Crowley and Martha Leon De La Barra. Actress Connie Britton introduced her, per a pool report, and she also did a Q&A with actress Elizabeth Banks.

The first lady said, per the pool report, “I wish that this election were about simple policy differences. I wish it were about differences of character or merit. But fundamentally, what this election is about is democracy.”

“We are the party defending it, not the one tearing it at its seams….We are the party protecting the right of this nation’s people to live freely, not the one praising the oppressive thumb of dictators.”

President Joe Biden attended a shiva, the traditional mourning gathering in Jewish households, for legendary TV writer Norman Lear on Saturday, according to a White House spokesperson. Lear, who died earlier this week at 101 years old, created numerous shows, including “All in the Family” and “The Jeffersons.”

White House Jewish liaison Shelley Greenspan shared Saturday afternoon that the president was visiting the home of the late producer and his wife Lyn.

Biden has been in Los Angeles for a series of fundraisers, many with Hollywood notables.

The president paid tribute to Lear following his death earlier this week in a statement, describing him as “a transformational force in American culture, whose trailblazing shows redefined television with courage, conscience, and humor, opening our nation’s eyes and often our hearts.”

Biden also praised Lear at an L.A. event Friday night, according to a White House press pool report, starting his closing remarks by saying, “You know, in this greatest city of the greatest storytellers in the world, we mourn the losses — and you mentioned Norman Lear. You know, his cast of characters painted a — a fuller picture of America, of our hopes and our hardships, our fears, our resilience, and changed the way we look at ourselves.

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“In explaining his approach to getting the laugh,” Biden continued, “to get us to laugh and think, Norman Lear said, and I quote, ‘You stand a better chance if you can get them caring first’ — ‘if you can get them caring first.’

“Folks, at our best, we’re a nation that cares. We care about each other; we care about the nation. And in — and in three years, we’re going to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Three years.

“Norman brought an original — bought an original copy of that. And he shared it with schools and museums so people could feel the patriotism that comes from being moved by its words.”

President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden rolled into Day Two of their their Los Angeles-area fundraising blitz on Saturday, Dec. 9, criss-crossing the city for myriad meetings, many of them at private homes in posh neighborhoods.

While most of the president’s stops were thought to be linked to efforts to fuel his campaign coffers, one was a solemn experience: Biden attended a shiva at the residence of Lyn and Norman Lear in honor of the pioneering TV producer’s death last week at the age of 101.

“You know, (Lear’s) cast of characters painted a fuller picture of America, of our hopes and our hardships, our fears, our resilience, and changed the way we look at ourselves,” Biden said Friday at an evening gala. “In explaining his approach to getting the laugh — to get us to laugh and think, Norman Lear said, and I quote, “You stand a better chance if you can get them caring first” — “if you can get them caring first.”

Biden added: “Folks, at our best, we’re a nation that cares. We care about each other; we care about the nation. And in — and in three years, we’re going to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Norman brought an original — bought an original copy of that. And he shared it with schools and museums.”

The president gave a 15-minute speech at an event hosted by investors Jose Feliciano and Kwanza Jones, where he touted items he regards as his administration’s accomplishments, from efforts to combat climate change to funding programs to undo the effects of pollution in poor and minority communities to jump-starting high speed rail.

As he hailed the rate at which Latinos were starting small businesses, a small child in the front rows piped up.